22441 - 2019 -Acute Kidney Injury

I would appreciate access to or copies of any trust policies / guidance for ambulance crews related to Acute Kidney Injury, together with links to any supporting evidence that I may be able to access.

  • Reference:
    22441
  • Response:

    I would appreciate access to or copies of any trust policies / guidance for ambulance crews related to Acute Kidney Injury, together with links to any supporting evidence that I may be able to access.

    East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust does not have a specific policy around Acute Kidney Injury.

    All clinicians work to JRCALC guidelines and, although it does not specifically refer to AKI, it does refer to elderly patients who have fallen are at higher risk of complications such as pneumonia, pressure areas, rhabdomyolosis, dehydration and hypothermia and that each patient will need to be assessed on an individual basis.

    There is no set standard to say that if a patient is on the floor for a certain amount of time that they would be at higher risk of having an AKI or renal failure. This would be patient specific and other considerations would need to be taken into account such as pre-existing illnesses and injuries.

    The local University which teaches students both in house (Dip HE) and Degree Paramedics students, who join the trust after completing their three year degree, teach the renal system in year 2 of the course. This involves a series of teaching, and covers the following:  

    1)  The online learning teaches the anatomy & physiology of the renal system, covering the structures and the role of the kidneys.  

    2) This learning is reviewed by self-testing online quizzes before a taught session is delivered with the aims of covering:  kidney function, anatomy & physiology, differentiation of acute, chronic & end stage renal failure with treatment types, plus the causes of renal failure - looking at pre, intrinsic and post causes such as reduction in blood flow to kidneys, damage to tubules, and renal calculi.  The session also looks at - for example - polycystic kidney disease, glomerular nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, diabetic nephropathy, rhabdomyolysis, pyelonephritis, urinary tract infections, 

    3) This learning is then applied in simulation and in other classes from a discussion perspective.  Attention is paid to differentiating between renal issues and other conditions, along with the early recognition of AKI.   The renal understanding and its application to patients is summatively assessed during the year.

    This training is delivered at Paramedic level and although the majority of emergency ambulances have a Paramedic on them some are crewed by grades below that of a Paramedic

  • Area:
    Trust wide
  • Category:
    Training
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  • Year: